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WIN THE INTERVIEW SERIES - PART 1 - DON'T JUST HOPE FOR THE BEST

Each spring, I have a few coaches ask me various questions about the interview process, so I thought I would do a series on how to 'win the interview.'


In my 21 years as a head coach, I have interviewed for several head coaching job and have literally interviewed hundreds of coaches. I have seen good things that I will share and some not-so-good things also.

A. MAKE SURE YOU ARE A GOOD FIT


Here we go...you are interested in a head coaching or assistant coaching job at school 'A'; before anything else, find out if you will be a good fit.


When you are interested in a job, by all means, research it. Find out everything you can about the position, your supervisors, the school, the community, etc.

I have made a few mistakes in my coaching moves, and each time they could have been avoided if I would have done more homework.


Early in my head coaching career, I moved my family 6 hours to work for a superintendent who was not a good fit for me. I could have found this out if I had asked more questions.

I once accepted a head coaching job where the system of how they do the athletic period, sub-varsity philosophy, budget (the list is long) was not in my 'wheel-house' at all. Shame on me for not doing more homework. 

B. DON'T EXPECT THEM TO MAKE BIG CHANGES FOR YOU


Do not get yourself into a situation where you won't be happy unless the school district is willing to make changes. When I interviewed at one of the schools above, I made sure I laid out my vision and the changes that would need to happen to turn the program into a solid winner. The answer was 'yes' then the following spring, the answer was 'no.' If you need a school district to make significant changes, don't be arrogant and believe they will do them 'down the road.' *The only exception to this is if the changes are implemented immediately. When I interviewed and then began at North Forney in the spring of 2017, the principal 'moved mountains' for me from day 1. She communicated that changes were necessary, and she was looking for someone to turn things 'upside-down' from where they were at the time.

So...if there is a job out there do your due diligence. Make calls, reach out to peers, and make sure your potential supervisors are 'your type of people.' Make sure the system is close to what you can live with. Don't 'hope for the best' that changes will be made down the line.


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